Quench Me.

There they were.

Drought resistant warriors waving hello.

 


My plane had just landed, and once outside, I was greeted instantly

by beautiful feathered fans and their graceful, timeless embrace.

I had feared I would find my old friends dry, brown, withered. 

But they had survived.

And they would continue to hold space, stand with purpose. 

My man remarked that I hadn’t stopped grinning since we'd touched down. 

I couldn’t.

I was back in the Realm of the Gods once again,

and that can be a tricky place, full of illusion.

'Cause Neptune rules this city, 

and everyone here falls under the influence.

But the sheer power of nature overtakes all that,

if you are connected to her,

 and stay close, tethered to her truth.

Desert climates have birthed the wisest of species, haven't they?

Native to the Americas, the prickly pear cactus lives mostly in the arid West, storing rare rain water from widespread roots, and protecting itself from predators with a sharp external shield. Plants are so smart. 

You can imagine my squeals of delight when I saw a carton of cactus water in my health food store back in New York...can you even imagine the hydration? I didn't even know it existed! The water comes from the fruit, actually, not the leaves, and get this: it's loaded with antioxidants, vitamins A, C, E, iron, calcium, AND has anti-inflammatory properties. The taste? Fabulous! It's fruity and light, and not a trace of sugar to be found. In fact, it actually lowers blood sugar. 

This calls for a cocktail!

Cactus Cordial

  • 6 oz. cactus water
  • 1 Tbsp organic hibiscus flowers
  • 2 drops lime essential oil
  • pure water
  • raspberries, for garnish

Start by making a little hibiscus tea ahead of time. You can either steep the flowers in cool water overnight, or heat the water, drop in the flowers, and let them rest there for 6-8 minutes, or longer. Hibiscus is an ancient remedy for cooling the body and moisturizing the skin (we can thank our Egyptian ancestors for that, Lovers). 

When the tea is cooled, strain it into a brandy snifter, or some such foxy late-night glass. Add in the cactus water, the lime oil, plop in a few berries...and enjoy! The lime adds a lick of refreshment in the form of an anti-aging tonic, the berries grace us with more antioxidants and beauty boosting vitamin E, so mingled with the flowers and the waters, we have a most exquisite potion!

Alright, Juicy Ones, have a gorgeous evening...

And, as for you, my dear city,

as you fade behind me,

I am missing you already.

'Til next we meet,

xxx Alise

The Spiral Staircase

When I stepped outside this morning, 

I looked up at the frosted glass sky

and something caught my eye

I thought it was a bird, but

it was a leaf,

A perfect crunchy crisp orange leaf turning to brown.

It was spiraling slowly down, in a graceful dance,

released from a majestic Maple,

and I stood there mesmerized by it.

The spiraling.

The sky was incredible, too.

Veiled with clouds, alive with mist

the air somewhere between mild and chilled

all the shades of grey making the remains of the autumn leaves on the ground,

the colors, 

even what was left of the green grasses all the more vibrant.

Such a strange and beautiful sight dappled among the first January frost.

I didn't even pause to take a picture of it for you,

because sometimes you lose the moment that way...

The imagery of the spiral is everywhere, if you are willing to look.

It carries with it ancient wisdom of the outer conciousness leading to the inner soul: the path leading from the ego into enlightenment. 

Evolution.

Divine union with cosmic energies.

I see taking care of ourselves as a spiral journey. We usually begin from a place of vanity, and gradually find our way inward, to healing and supporting what cannot always be seen, but has a profound effect on the whole, and, yes, the exterior.

You've heard me say many times, "beauty begins on the inside." 

Truth.

It begins with giving, love, and compassion from our hearts, and extends to how we experience nourishment. When we feed ourselves from a place of kindness, both for ourselves and for the planet, baby, it shows.

Which brings me back to my wish for you to indulge in the beauty of living, loving, radiant raw plant foods, even as the sky turns somber, and the air boldly ventures towards glacial. I gave you a few basic tips in my last entry, but you know me...I like to keep things interesting.

And so, I have a very seductive ladyfriend I want to introduce you to:

Who says kitchen appliances aren't sexy?

Who says kitchen appliances aren't sexy?

This alluring hourglass is known by her street name: The Spiralizer. And, Beasties, she packs a wallop. There are enormous, weighty, stupid-expensive versions of her out there that will take up all of your counter space, and theoretically work better, but I prefer the feel of this lightweight, packable vixen right in my hands.

Her magic? She creates noodles out of vegetables!

That's right, my Loves, you can enjoy all your fave sauces with a light and nutritionally dense "pasta", keeping it raw and real. 

I conjured this for you as a gorgeous cold-weather raw dish, satisfying and sensuous, deeply flavored and easy on your beautiful belly.

Try it.

Wanton Walnut Pesto Noodles

  • 2-3 large organic carrots
  • 2 large organic beets
  • 1 large organic zucchini
  • 2 C fresh organic cilantro leaves
  • 1/2 C walnuts, soaked for 2 hours, drained and rinsed
  • 3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1/4 C olive oil, extra virgin and cold pressed
  •  A pinch Celtic salt, plus more to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper (optional)

The fist thing you must know is that you can find a spiralizer in in kitchen shop, or online.

The second, that you can use a variety of vegetables here. I've chosen the ones easiest to spiralize, but you can omit anything you don't like, and get playful, won't you? Try different combinations with different sauces, get creative with seasonal veggies...I love the colors here for shaking up a dreary day.

The mistake often made is making the noodles and plopping them right into the sauce, which makes them too crunchy. You won't make that foible, of course. You're going to rinse the veggies first,  and lop off the inedible ends. Then, if needed, cut them down so they are slim enough to put through the spiralizer. The zucchini and carrot will be fine as is, but you may need to trim the beets a little. You just take the vegetable in one hand, the spiralizer in the other, start at the top, and twist. (See how it works? Yes! That's it!) You will have little conical bits left at the end that can be chopped up and added to salads, or into a juice shake.

So now, when you have a bowl full of stunningly pretty noodles, sprinkle them with a pinch of Celtic salt, and let them sit in a colander in the sink for about a half hour. This is the trick to making them soft and pasta-y. 

While they're relaxing, just toss all the remaining ingredients except the additional salt and pepper into a food processor, and pulse until it gets creamy and mostly smooth. Now ease it onto the noodles, a little at a time, tossing with tongs to really get the sauce in there. Don't drown the noodles with the sauce, Lovers. Just use enough to coat them, and save the rest. You can always make another noodle batch in a day or two, or use it as a pesto-ish spread on gluten-free bruchetta. Add a few grinds of fresh pepper, a tiny pinch of salt only if needed (taste it first!), and a dash of cayenne if you desire some heat. 

Now you're ready to plate and...devour!

Vitamins, minerals, macro-nutrients...they're all there, as always, my Darlings, for you, transformed into a luscious and libidinous feast, bringing magick into the body, and radiating outward...

I love you.

xxx Alise

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